The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

offshore-energy  offshore-access  department-of-defense  atlantic-ocs  leasing-plan 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 1, 2017

A sensible, safe and forward-looking offshore energy strategy – one that acknowledges that keeping 94 percent of federal offshore acreage off limits to responsible development risks U.S. energy security – underscores the need for reliable scientific data to establish the size and location of offshore oil and natural gas reserves, through safe seismic testing. Every other discussion about where offshore development may occur in the years ahead is premature until the resource base is known. In this context, a recent claim that U.S. military priorities and offshore energy development in the Atlantic Ocean are mostly incompatible is just plain silly.

Read More

electric-grid  natural-gas  consumers  energy-department  ferc 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 31, 2017

Sizing up points made on both sides of Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s proposal that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission change the electricity marketplace: government intervention vs. market competition; propping up certain generation facilities vs. protecting consumers; diversity in power generation for diversity’s sake vs. what’s best for grid health. We’ll go with markets, consumers and grid health – all of which point toward electricity generation fueled by abundant, affordable, reliable natural gas.

Read More

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 26, 2017

If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck and sounds like a duck – then it’s probably a duck, right? With Arkansas’ annual duck hunting season drawing nigh, the old saying probably is on the minds of thousands of state duck hunters, looking to extend a treasured tradition in these parts. Energy will give them a hand.

Between November and January, millions of ducks traveling along the Mississippi Flyway descend on Arkansas’ rolling prairies, flooded timber and serene wetlands – to the delight of the state’s 87,000 duck hunters. They’ll be dressed in camo and waders. They’ll deploy floating duck decoys and arm themselves with shotgun shells. They’ll sit for hours in duck blinds, perhaps with their loyal retriever. Energy will help them make the most of the opportunity.

Read More

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 24, 2017

Long-time residents of Washington state joke that the western part, between the Cascades and the Pacific Ocean has two seasons – a rainy one that keeps forests of evergreens ever green, and a dry one that begins promptly on July 5, the day after soggy Independence Day festivities.

More seriously, Washington’s seasons, its climate, elevations and other factors combine to make great grapes – ultimately making the state the country’s second-largest premium wine producer in the country. Natural gas and oil help make it so – playing essential supporting roles in wine-making just as they do in so many other aspects of modern life, all across the 50 states.

Read More

air-quality  ozone-standards  epa34  emission-reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 20, 2017

The current state of ozone regulation is a mess – and Washington needs to do something about it.

Late in 2015, EPA imposed new standards for ozone air quality, which posed an immediate problem out in the rest of the country because existing, 2008 standards weren’t yet fully implemented. Basically, the states were faced with having to deal with two competing sets of ozone regulations. As we wrote at the time, the 2015 standards weren’t necessary because the 2008 regime already was working and would continue to work toward better air quality.

Today, this confusing, unnecessary situation remains – unnecessary because air quality continues to improve.

Read More

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 19, 2017

Autumn is nature’s showiest time of year. In Virginia, as in other states, lush, green forests give way to the unmistakable colors of fall – with leaves in many parts of the commonwealth reaching peak right about now. There’s nothing quite like the season’s display of fiery colors against the deep-blue autumn sky. It’s a sight to see, free of charge – and there’s perhaps no better place to see it than in Virginia’s Shenandoah region. Here are just a few of the many ways you can get outside and take it in – all of which are made possible by the unsung wonders of natural gas and oil.

Read More

offshore  social-license-to-operate  safety  offshore-safety 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted October 18, 2017

Keeping our workforce safe is just one area of continuously improving safety that the natural gas and oil industry works hard on every day. Whether it’s checking pipelines for potential damage, transporting products via rail car, storing natural gas supplies underground, or producing in deepwater, our industry is committed to safe operations as a core value. One area where the industry brings a keen focus  is the safety of offshore operations, including asset integrity and safety and environmental management systems.

Read More

ferc  electric-grid  natural-gas  consumers 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 17, 2017

It’s unclear what the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) will do with U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s request that FERC alter the electricity marketplace in favor of certain generating facilities – a proposal that by design would favor some energy sources over others.

Perry says his request to FERC was meant to be a conversation starter. But if it’s a conversation about government tilting the electricity market one way or another, it’s the wrong one.

Indeed, as the secretary tried to explain his FERC order to lawmakers at a House hearing last week he missed the mark when he questioned the reliability of natural gas, the leading fuel for U.S. electricity generation in 2016, and asserted that the natural gas and oil industry receives federal subsidies – it doesn’t.

Read More

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 17, 2017

“Life consists with wildness. The most alive is the wildest. Not yet subdued to man, its presence refreshes him.” – Henry David Thoreau, “Walking,” 1851

In the wilds of Maine this time of year, you’re running out of time to climb Mount Katahdin and reach the northern terminus of the Appalachian Trail. Winter is coming, and soon the weather will begin to close in on Baxter Peak, nearly a mile above sea level and the mountain’s tallest point – where the A.T. starts its 2,190-mile meander across 14 states, to its southern end in northern Georgia.

The Appalachian Trail is rustic, rugged and wild – maybe wilder than even a soul as solitary as Thoreau would fancy. One section of the trail just south of Mount Katahdin, called the Hundred-Mile Wilderness, might be the wildest of the wild for the challenges it presents even to experienced hikers. Since its birth in the 1920s, the A.T. has tested the mettle of tens of thousands of outdoorsmen and women of all abilities, including the uber-committed types who do the trail in its entirety – called thru-hiking. There are no electric lights on the trail, no vehicles, yet energy is with every hiker looking to their wild out.

Think: shoes, tents, backpacks and outerwear for the trek from Maine to Georgia, or whereabouts in between. The popularity of traveling the A.T. from end-to-end has skyrocketed, with 6,342 hikers completing thru-hikes since 2010 – more than a third of the total hikers to date. To make it through difficult terrain and changing weather conditions requires preparation – to stay warm and as dry as possible with durable gear produced from natural gas and petroleum by-products.

Read More