The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

economic-impacts  jobs  oil-and-natural-gas  new-york  south-carolina  maryland 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 2, 2017

Energy-producing states and non-producers – all state economies are positively impacted by an industry that accounted for 7.6 percent of U.S. GDP in 2015. Yet, the state-level story also is about the opportunity for growth so that industry’s economic benefits have even greater impact in certain parts of the country. 

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maryland  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  natural-gas  jobs  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 1, 2017

Maryland lawmakers pushing for a permanent state ban on hydraulic fracturing should touch base with their constituents first. A new Goucher College poll finds that among those who have an opinion on fracking, most don’t want the state to make the current fracking moratorium permanent. Goucher surveyed 776 people earlier this month and found 40 percent oppose banning hydraulic fracturing, with 36 percent supporting a ban.

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hydraulic-fracturing  maryland 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 17, 2016

Given the way safe energy development is helping next-door Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio, it’s hard to figure out the thinking in Maryland, where proposed hydraulic fracturing regulations could squelch benefits for state residents and businesses without making things any safer.

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maryland  lng-exports  natural-gas  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 29, 2016

An all-of-the-above energy narrative is playing out in Maryland – as it is in the country at large. The United States is the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas, fuels that are complemented by coal, nuclear, solar, wind and other renewable energy sources.  It’s an approach that serves the nation well and should be supported by pro-development policies

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analysis  maryland  crude-oil-exports  income  energy  gasoline-prices  lng34  pricewaterhousecoopers  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 5, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Maryland. We started this week with Florida and Kansas; the series began on June 29 with Virginia. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Maryland, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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innovation  technology  jobs  fracking  new-york  maryland  pipelines  gulf 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 31, 2015

TribLive (Blog): I was taken with the mud the moment they told me it could talk. I had some built-up interest, sure. But its communicative abilities really were the clincher for me. This is the story of how I explored a drilling rig, discovered drilling mud, and got pretty into it.

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liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  maryland  economic-benefits  government-revenues 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 26, 2015

A welcome development in the larger effort to see the U.S. become a major player in the global energy marketplace: groundbreaking ceremonies this week at Maryland’s Cove Point liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility.

Gov. Larry Hogan joined other golden shovel-wielding dignitaries at Cove Point, built as an LNG import terminal but which is undergoing a $3.8 billion expansion to allow LNG export capability.

Cove Point and other proposed LNG export terminals are the key needed infrastructure for the world’s leading producer of natural gas to get its LNG to market.

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american-energy  exports  maryland  fracking  geothermal  wind  economy  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 26, 2015

ExxonMobil Perspectives Blog: Lawmakers in Maryland are considering legislation to extend the de facto ban on hydraulic fracturing put in place by former Governor Martin O’Malley. Specifically, Annapolis currently is considering a proposal to ban the practice in the state’s portion of the Marcellus Shale for at least three years. This would be a bad idea for Maryland for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is the fact that natural gas has played an increasingly larger role in the state’s energy mix in recent years. Meanwhile coal has become increasingly less important.

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maryland  safe-operations  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  natural-gas-development  shale-energy  tax-revenues  royalty-payments  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 2, 2014

Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley’s recent announcement – that he plans to lift the state’s three-year moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, possibly clearing the way for future natural gas development – is potentially good news for the state, its citizens and America’s broader energy picture.

A new report by the state’s Department of the Environment and the Department of Natural Resources details some of the possible benefits:Garrett County in western Maryland could gain as many as 2,425 new jobs while realizing $3.6 million in tax revenues and $13.5 million in severance tax revenues.Neighboring Allegany County could see as many as 908 new jobs, $1.8 million in tax revenues and $2.3 million in severance tax revenues over 10 years. “Royalty payments to the owners and lessors of mineral rights could provide significant income,” the report says.

Significantly, the department concludes what a number of other states have found and are demonstrating – that advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling to develop natural gas and oil from shale and other tight-rock formations can be conducted safely and efficiently.

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exports  jobs  ohio  maryland  texas  north-dakota 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 29, 2014

NEW YORK (AP) — Whether to allow more exports of U.S. oil and natural gas has become a matter of political debate in Washington. But to economists, the answer is clear: The nation would benefit.

The vast majority of economists surveyed this month by The Associated Press say lifting restrictions on exports of oil and natural gas would help the economy even if it meant higher fuel prices for consumers.

More exports would encourage investment in oil and gas production and transport, create jobs, make oil and gas supplies more stable and reduce the U.S. trade deficit, they say.

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