The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

taxes  innovation  investment  international-petroleum-market 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 14, 2017

Tax reform legislation is advancing in the U.S. Senate, and it’s good that Finance Committee Chairman Orin Hatch and a number of senators are pursuing pro-growth, pro-development changes that would modernize the tax code and help improve the competitiveness of U.S. businesses operating internationally. Such reforms would help strengthen our economy, spur investment and boost job creation. 

Read More

economic-growth  earnings  energy-development  investment  jobs  royalties  taxes  trump 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 31, 2017

President Trump’s call for tax reform this week, kicking off the administration’s push for pro-growth measures to spur investment, create jobs and raise earnings is one we can certainly understand. The president said:

“We need a competitive tax code that creates more jobs and higher wages for Americans. It’s time to give American workers the pay raise that they've been looking for, for many, many years. … If we do this, if we unite in the name of common sense and the name of common good, then we will add millions and millions of new jobs, bring back trillions of dollars, and we will give America the competitive advantage that it so desperately needs and has been looking for for so long. It’s time.”

No argument here. The natural gas and oil industry is about economic growth: investing, creating jobs and boosting worker pay for years – on the way to supporting 10.3 million jobs while adding $1.3 trillion to the national economy and aiding growth across all 50 states. 

Read More

vote4energy  us-energy-security  oil-and-natural-gas  innovation  investment  economic-growth  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 20, 2016

Because of vast energy reserves and the advanced technologies and expertise to safely develop them, the United States’ energy future looks promising and secure. America continues to lead the world in oil and natural gas production, which is critically important for a future in which both are projected to remain the leading fuels supporting our economy and modern way of living. Energy security, in increasing measure, is in our hands … if.

If we make the right energy policy choices, and if we select leaders who will advance those policies. If we safely harness America’s energy wealth, if we foster the private investment and innovation that launched the ongoing energy revolution – if we do all these things, there’s no reason the United States can’t benefit from secure energy far into the future.

In this election year we should identify visionary leaders on energy issues – those who see and grasp the historic opportunity provided by surging domestic oil and gas production and also the actions needed to keep that production going. In that sense, energy can be a 2016 vote-decider.

Read More

jobs  infrastructure  natural-gas-pipelines  investment  economic-growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted May 18, 2016

The average American household has saved almost $750 in annual energy costs compared to 2008, according to recent data released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Greater availability of domestic oil and natural gas, made possible by hydraulic fracturing, has helped drive down prices for gasoline, electricity and home heating.

Keeping affordable, reliable energy moving to families and businesses requires infrastructure -- pipelines, storage, processing, rail and maritime resources. Candidates often make infrastructure development a centerpiece of their economic plans, promising to create jobs and modernize the U.S. transportation system by improving roads, bridges, rail networks and airports. Energy infrastructure should be on that list. Shovel-ready projects abound in the energy sector.

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-production  regulation  emission-reductions  investment  methane 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 22, 2016

Timing is everything. With much of the Middle Atlantic braced for “Snowzilla,” the Obama administration announced a new layer of federal regulation that likely will make it more difficult and costly for energy producers to deliver the affordable, reliable, clean-burning natural gas that so many U.S. consumers rely on for winter warmth.

Imagine: Millions of Americans, covered in snow and ice, as the president and his team advance a regulatory blizzard with unnecessary Bureau of Land Management (BLM) rules on methane that ignore emissions reductions already being realized and that threaten to stifle future production – potentially at great cost to consumers, the economy, government revenue streams and U.S. security.

Read More

news  american-energy  innovation  investment  fracking  shale-energy  manufacturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 25, 2015

CNN (Petraeus and Bhayani) – Fracking. 3D printing. Personalized medicine. Big data.

Each is a compelling technological trend. And taken together, advances in energy production, manufacturing, life sciences and IT amount to four interlocking revolutions that could make North America the next great emerging market -- as long as policymakers in this country don't impede their potential.

The impact of these four revolutions is already evident in the enviable economic position enjoyed by Canada, Mexico and United States compared with the rest of the world.

Read More

analysis  infrastructure  oil-and-natural-gas-development  pipelines  permitting  regulation  energy-department  eia34  investment 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 19, 2015

The issue was energy infrastructure – where the United States is and where things are headed. At the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) annual conference this week, one discussion honed in on the challenges to infrastructure approval and construction – as well as government’s best role in developing projects that are key to U.S. energy transport and overall energy security. The latter produced some friction between speakers not often seen at conferences like EIA’s. More below.

The U.S. Energy Department’s Melanie Kenderdine talked about some of the details in the department’s recently issued Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), which focused on ways to modernize the nation’s infrastructure.

Read More

keystone-xl-pipeline  congress  president-obama  economic-benefits  canadian-oil-sands  infrastructure  investment 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 12, 2015

In a democratic republic like ours, the legislative branch is the voice of the people. Throughout the long – too long – debate over the Keystone XL pipeline, the White House has used politics to stymie a conclusion on the matter. But no more.

House approval of a Senate bill advancing the pipeline will require President Obama to finally decide. Bipartisan majorities in both houses of the Congress of the United States have spoken. The American people, through their elected representatives, have spoken. The president should listen.

Unfortunately, the White House has signaled that he won’t, that he will veto the Keystone XL bill. It would make a mockery of post-Election 2014 assurances from the president that he would work with Congress to accomplish substantive things for the American people. Substantive things like: 42,100 jobs that the U.S. State Department says would be supported by the pipeline’s construction, $2 billion in workers’ pockets and $3.4 billion added to U.S. GDP, according to State’s report, and 830,000 barrels of oil from Canada and the U.S. Bakken region – North American oil that would strengthen U.S. energy security

All of the above and more clearly make the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline in the national interest.

Read More

keystone-xl-pipeline  president-obama  infrastructure  investment  economic-benefits  job-creation  nebraska  state-department  canada  congress  refinieries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 10, 2015

Throughout the Keystone XL pipeline’s long wait for federal approval, President Obama has used one excuse after another to deflect responsibility for blocking a project that polls in the 70s with the American people, one that would support thousands of U.S. jobs and help move the country closer to North American energy security. All along the way the president could have exercised his authority to say yes to all of the above but deferred instead.

The president said environmental questions needed answers, and they were provided by his own State Department, which cleared Keystone XL in five separate environmental reviews.

The president said the cross-border approval process – required because Keystone XL would cross the U.S.-Canadian border – needed to run its course. It did and then some, stretching now to more than six years when historically, cross-border approvals are granted in 18 to 24 months.

The president said Nebraska needed to work out the pipeline’s route through that state, which it did. Then the president said the state’s Supreme Court would have to settle a legal challenge over the re-routing process.

On Friday, Nebraska’s high court rejected that challenge, confirming the assessment of the state Department of Environmental Quality and the governor’s recommendation to the State Department – leaving the project with only one remaining obstacle: President Obama.

Read More