The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

consumers  ohio  natural-gas  electricity  nuclear 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 10, 2017

Ohio lawmakers are discussing a proposal to establish zero-emission credits for nuclear plants, giving them an advantage against other energy sources. Instead of government picking winners and losers, the marketplace should determine an energy source’s viability – based on affordability, efficiency and other factors – letting the market work for consumers.

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natural-gas  pipelines  infrastructure  electricity  new-hampshire  maine  vermont  rhode-island  connecticut  massachusetts 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 15, 2017

The solution is more natural gas pipeline capacity, by building new lines or by expanding existing ones. New England policymakers should foster infrastructure by considering fair and appropriate financing mechanisms to help pay for new projects and by working to build community support for safe and responsible project development. This is the sensible path to keep New England’s consumers from paying more than is necessary for their energy.

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100-days  natural-gas  electricity  emission-reductions  environmental-impact 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 13, 2017

American natural gas is the answer to a number of energy and climate questions. It’s generating the power we need for our homes and businesses, providing the building blocks for our manufacturing renaissance and making our nation and our allies more secure.

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infrastructure  pipelines  natural-gas  electricity 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 20, 2016

With a new administration and a new Congress coming to Washington, Americans may hope for new policies to advance energy infrastructure construction in this country. Change is needed. Even though more than 80 percent of registered voters support additional infrastructure, and policymakers talk about it as a pressing national need all the time, a number of factors – including anti-progress activism and government red tape – delay, stall and/or threaten to block new pipelines and other essential energy projects. Forward-looking leadership will dismantle artificial impediments to safe development.

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carbon-dioxide-emissions  natural-gas  electricity  climate  environmental-impact 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted December 9, 2016

The concept that economic growth doesn’t have to be accompanied by rising carbon emissions – dubbed “decoupling” by the New York Times – has additional detail in a new Brookings Institution report that finds more than 30 states have seen those historical partners delinked and headed in different directions. Though Brookings credits state and local efforts for the majority of this emissions reduction progress between 2000 and 2014, cleaner-burning natural gas is the real hero. 

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carbon-emissions  climate  economic-growth  electricity  energy  hydraulic-fracturing  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 13, 2016

A couple of charts and a great-news story for the United States in terms of its carbon dioxide emissions.

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new-hampshire  pipelines  natural-gas  electricity  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 21, 2016

New Hampshire is without oil and natural gas reserves of its own. Nuclear accounted for about 47 percent of the state’s net electricity generation last year, with natural gas supplying about 30 percent. But since that gas – as well as natural gas for home heating – must come from elsewhere, the state (and the rest of New England for that matter) is engaged in an important conversation over ensuring adequate pipeline capacity to meet home, commercial and industrial needs.

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utica  shale  carbon-emissions  energy  electricity  fracking-safety  hydraulic-fracturing  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 15, 2016

When approximately 4,700 delegates and alternates gather in Cleveland next week for the Republican National Convention, energy will play a major role – powering the Quicken Loans Arena, transporting delegates and support staff to and from “The Q,” running television broadcast equipment, cooking food, supporting high-tech communications and much more.

Think about energy’s role this way: Without modern energy supplied by oil and natural gas, the event would bear a strong resemblance to the GOP’s 1860 convention, when Abraham Lincoln was nominated at the Wigwam in Chicago.

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natural-gas  electricity  economic-benefits  infrastructure  fracking  pipelines 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 14, 2016

CNBC has put out its annual ranking of America’s top states for business, an analysis based on a number of things including metrics for workforce, infrastructure, access to capital and quality of life. Another of those metrics, cost of living, caught our eye because energy was part of the calculation. Indeed, in CNBC’s ranking of the country’s 10 most expensive states to live in, the cost of energy to residents a key factor.

Five members of that dubious top 10 are New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire, and energy costs there are higher than they need to be. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), those states and neighbors Maine and Vermont all had costs for residential electricity and natural gas that exceeded national averages this past winter. Of course, these states are located in a part of the country where more energy infrastructure (see previous posts here and here) could positively impact energy costs.  

A couple of charts show the cost being borne by consumers in those states, in part, because there’s inadequate natural gas pipeline infrastructure to meet home heating and power generation needs during peak winter months.

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climate  economic-growth  electricity  energy  fossil-fuels  greenhouse-gas-emissions  energy-information-administration 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 11, 2016

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) annual energy conference is under way in Washington, D.C.  Here are a few highlights from the first slate of speakers, which included John Holdren, assistant to the president for science and technology, and Gregory Goff, Tesoro Corporation president and CEO.

Holdren went first, saying that the driver of technology in the future will be finding solutions to what he called the energy/climate challenge:

“Without energy there is no economy, without climate there is no environment and without economy and environment there’s no well-being, there’s no civil society, there’s no personal or national security, there’s no economic growth."

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