The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  consumers  ethanol 

Sabrina Fang

Sabrina Fang
Posted November 10, 2017

On Nov. 30, EPA is scheduled to finalize 2018 ethanol volumes for the U.S. fuel supply under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Yet, the RFS remains a broken program that’s also outdated, its original purposes overtaken by the U.S. energy renaissance. This week, API Downstream Group Director Frank Macchiarola told reporters that Congress needs to protect American consumers from potential risks posed by RFS mandates.

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emission-reductions  natural-gas  consumers  social-license-to-operate 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted November 3, 2017

“Today, the U.S. is both the largest producer of natural gas and the world leader in reducing emissions. When it comes to propelling the U.S. forward with energy in the 21st century, “we no longer have to choose between more energy and a cleaner environment.”

– API President and CEO Jack Gerard 

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electric-grid  consumers  natural-gas  ferc 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 2, 2017

OK, going a little more visual today. Leading off, we’ve got a terrific new video that shows natural gas is the “heart” of our country’s 21st-century electric power system – very timely given the heat that’s being generated by Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s proposal for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to alter the electricity marketplace in ways that would favor certain generating facilities. The video makes these important points: Natural gas-fueled generation has unique attributes that enhance the reliability and resiliency of the U.S. power system; natural gas-fueled generation can quickly ramp up or down depending on generation needs; and competitive markets have made natural gas the fuel of choice, benefiting consumers.

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electric-grid  natural-gas  consumers  energy-department  ferc 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 31, 2017

Sizing up points made on both sides of Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s proposal that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission change the electricity marketplace: government intervention vs. market competition; propping up certain generation facilities vs. protecting consumers; diversity in power generation for diversity’s sake vs. what’s best for grid health. We’ll go with markets, consumers and grid health – all of which point toward electricity generation fueled by abundant, affordable, reliable natural gas.

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ferc  electric-grid  natural-gas  consumers 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 17, 2017

It’s unclear what the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) will do with U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s request that FERC alter the electricity marketplace in favor of certain generating facilities – a proposal that by design would favor some energy sources over others.

Perry says his request to FERC was meant to be a conversation starter. But if it’s a conversation about government tilting the electricity market one way or another, it’s the wrong one.

Indeed, as the secretary tried to explain his FERC order to lawmakers at a House hearing last week he missed the mark when he questioned the reliability of natural gas, the leading fuel for U.S. electricity generation in 2016, and asserted that the natural gas and oil industry receives federal subsidies – it doesn’t.

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trade  canada  mexico  us-energy  consumers  jobs  investments 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 10, 2017

With talks between the U.S., Canada and Mexico on modernizing NAFTA heading for a fourth round this week, our negotiators can help ensure the global competitiveness of U.S. energy companies by working to retain strong protections for U.S. investments abroad through the agreement’s investment protections and investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) provision.

ISDS sounds a little wonky, but its basic mission is pretty straightforward: It helps protect U.S. investors from being treated unfairly by host nation governments. Conversely, there’s potential jeopardy if the U.S. allows ISDS to be weakened or removed in the current talks. It could undermine ISDS provisions globally in other treaties and agreements.

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ohio  natural-gas  consumers  electricity 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 5, 2017

Ohio voters continue to oppose bailouts for nuclear plants. As a statewide poll showed this summer, a new poll by API Ohio shows big opposition to a proposal to let nuclear plant owner FirstEnergy charge its customers a special fee to increase funding for its plants in three counties that are near FirstEnergy’s headquarters and its Davis-Besse and Perry nuclear plants. The opposition in Lake, Summit and Ottawa counties is bipartisan and huge.

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natural-gas  consumers  electric-grid  ferc 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 4, 2017

Some initial takeaways from this week’s House hearing, during which there was considerable discussion of the U.S. Energy Department’s recent request that a new electricity pricing program be developed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission – one that effectively would favor some energy sources over others.

First, as we argued twice last week (read here and here), markets – not preferences, mechanisms, subsidies or whatever – should be allowed to select energy sources for power generation, because they reward innovation, promote efficiency, lower prices and work to benefit consumers.

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lng-exports  natural-gas  consumers  economic-growth  jobs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 3, 2017

Here’s what we’ve learned since a 2013 study projected job and economic gains from exporting U.S. liquefied natural gas: The jobs and economic growth are still positive and significant, the domestic price impacts are about half of what was estimated four years ago and we have more natural gas than we thought.

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consumers  natural-gas  electric-grid  ferc 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 29, 2017

Earlier this week we wrote about the market perils of government efforts to favor some energy sources over others (“On Energy, Let Markets Choose”). We may as well have been talking about Friday’s U.S. Energy Department request that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) develop a new electricity pricing program that lets some power plants recover the costs of providing that power.

Whatever you call these preferential measures – subsidies, mechanisms, credits – they tend to foil the way markets, if left to themselves, reward innovation, promote efficiency, lower prices and work to benefit consumers.

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