The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

gasoline-prices  crude-oil  gasoline-blends  gasoline-taxes  consumers 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted May 31, 2018

In a recently released report, the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development digs into the factors that have made the U.S. energy dominance possible, and – specifically – the role of natural gas in energy dominance. 

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gasoline-prices  crude-oil  gasoline-blends  gasoline-taxes  consumers 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 24, 2018

Let’s add some needed perspective in the ongoing discussion of U.S. gasoline prices – even as Washington politicians try to exploit them for their own agendas. The latest political play: Senate Democrats want the president to cajole other nations into producing more oil to increase supply in hopes of moderating things at the pump.

Certainly, increasing global crude supply is important, because in the past doing so has put downward pressure on the cost of crude, the No. 1 factor driving gasoline prices.

But, since we’ve seen how much lower and less volatile prices have been the past four years, thanks to the growth of U.S. oil production, wouldn’t it be smarter to encourage greater oil production here at home? Senate Energy Committee Chairwoman Lisa Murkowski

thinks so.

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natural-gas-benefits  consumers  emission-reductions  air-quality 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted April 25, 2018

There are plenty of statistics out there to measure the scope of U.S. natural gas production. The United States is the No. 1 natural gas producer in the world, producing 78.9 billion cubic feet per day in 2017. Exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) nearly quadrupled in 2017, making the U.S. a net natural gas exporter for the first time in nearly 60 years and supporting hundreds of thousands of jobs across the nation. 

The numbers are impressive, but the economic and climate benefits they make possible are even more remarkable. In a new series of short videos, we’ve boiled down the natural gas advantage into five words.


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electric-grid  nuclear  consumers  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 3, 2018

Ohio-based utility FirstEnergy’s efforts to land a bailout from consumers have crossed over from the problematic to the absurd.

With the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in January rejecting a bid to alter the electricity marketplace in ways that would favor some generating facilities over others, FirstEnergy last week launched an end-run around FERC, asking U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry to basically do what FERC wouldn’t do – bail out up to 85 generating units, all coal and nuclear – claiming there’s an emergency with the reliability of the electricity grid.   

To which the regional power grid operator, PJM Interconnection, quite accurately, responded: What emergency? 

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crude-oil-prices  gasoline-prices  supply  consumers 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted April 2, 2018

The summer driving season is arriving, so it’s a good time to take stock of recent market dynamics that have raised per-barrel costs for crude oil and consequently gasoline and diesel fuel.

Nationwide, the American Automobile Association (AAA) reports that average prices currently are $2.64 per gallon for gasoline (up from $2.54 a month ago) and $2.95 per gallon for diesel fuel (unchanged from last month). While there is nothing particularly special about these figures from an economic perspective, consumers take notice when fuel prices are on the rise. Let’s look at the factors that have affected pump prices in recent years.

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natural-gas-benefits  emission-reductions  consumers  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 15, 2018

By now I hope you’ve seen API’s new national TV ad that is air during NCAA basketball tournament games, touting the benefits of U.S. natural gas. The ad’s message is as clear as America’s air: Thanks to increasing use of clean, affordable natural gas, U.S. emissions of carbon dioxide from electricity generation – a major source of the greenhouse gas – are at their lowest level in 25 years. That’s an amazing development for a couple reasons.


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lng-exports  natural-gas  consumers  economic-growth 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted February 28, 2018

In the first API Chart of the Month, we looked at historical U.S. trade in oil and natural gas. This month, let’s examine global liquefied natural gas (LNG) prices, which increasingly have helped to anchor U.S. natural gas production and reinvigorate local jobs, wages, housing, education and services – everything that comes with major new capital projects and their broad-based boost to the economy.

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offshore-leasing-plan  consumers  economic-growth  safe-operations  us-energy-security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 8, 2018

As a nation, we have a tremendous opportunity to safely and efficiently harness our offshore natural gas and oil reserves. Here are three important points that should be prominent during the public hearing phase of the process to develop the next federal offshore leasing plan.

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natural-gas  electric-grid  consumers  ferc  energy-markets 

Todd Snitchler

Todd Snitchler
Posted February 8, 2018

The American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity recently posted this blog attacking natural gas as a fuel for electricity generation during winter cold snaps. It’s a familiar refrain, which we’ve refuted a number of times (including herehere and here). The fact is our nation’s electric grid is as reliable as ever, which recent data indicates. False narratives about unfounded reliability concerns – as a tool for advocating one fuel type over another – hurt efforts to improve the grid’s reliability and resilience. As for the performance of natural gas as a generating fuel during extreme cold, let’s review the record.

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natural-gas  infrastructure  consumers  heating-fuels  electricity  massachusetts  connecticut  rhode-island  vermont  new-hampshire  maine 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 24, 2018

There’s a new data point from New England that underscores the region’s lack of sufficient natural gas infrastructure. A new study from ISO New England finds there’s a better than 80 percent chance that some or all of the region faces rolling blackouts in the near future – chiefly because it can’t get enough natural gas when there’s peak winter demand. For a country that leads the world in natural gas and oil production, having an entire region at the mercy of cold weather pretty much ranks as a national embarrassment – the kind of thing that happens in under-developed parts of the world. 

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