The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas  emission-reductions  blm34  regulation  methane 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 21, 2017

The Bureau of Land Management’s “venting and flaring” rule should be repealed, which we’ve urged Congress to do under the Congressional Review Act (see here, here and here). The U.S. House has voted for repeal, and the Senate shouldn’t delay in following suit. BLM’s redundant, technically flawed rule already is having negative economic impacts and could put energy production and important progress on reducing emissions at risk.

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emission-reductions  air-quality  carbon-dioxide  methane  epa34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 16, 2017

There’s a lot of good news to be found in EPA’s draft Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2015, which came out this week – all of it underscoring progress, much of it led by industry, in reducing emissions – even as American consumers and the U.S. economy are supplied the energy they need.

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regulation  blm34  methane  natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 3, 2017

Last week we encouraged Congress to use the Congressional Review Act to repeal the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) technically flawed and redundant venting and flaring rule. It appears lawmakers are poised to do just that – concerned that the rule could discourage future energy investment on Indian and federal lands, where production trails output on state and private land, and that it risks negatively impacting supplies of affordable energy to American consumers and businesses. Good reasons all to axe BLM’s rule. Likewise, repeal would be responsive to the specific concerns of voices in the West, where vast acreages are under federal control.

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methane  oil-and-natural-gas  vote4energy  emissions  emissions-control-equipment  emission-reductions  everything 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted December 7, 2016

America’s energy renaissance is producing record volumes of natural gas, helping supply our country’s energy needs and strengthening our security while also advancing climate goals, including reducing carbon dioxide emissions and key pollutants. Thanks to cleaner-burning natural gas, you can make a strong “green” case for hydraulic fracturing, as some are doing.

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natural-gas  hydraulic-fracturing  emission-reductions  carbon-dioxide  methane 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 7, 2016

The market approach works. What’s more, the energy development underlying that approach is recording lower methane emissions. New data released by EPA shows that methane emissions from oil and natural gas production fell in 2015, marking the fourth straight year of declines and documenting industry efforts to reduce them.

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natural-gas  methane  emission-reductions  climate  technology 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted September 16, 2016

The U.S. oil and natural gas industry has proven that we can develop the energy that our economy relies upon here at home, while ensuring that those resources are developed safely and responsibly. This includes developing and applying technologies and best practices that effectively reduce emissions of methane, which is the key component of natural gas and thus a vital product for our industry to bring to the U.S. market.

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greenhouse-gas-emission-reduction  carbon-dioxide  methane  ozone  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 31, 2016

In recent months we’ve posted a number of times on the “U.S. Model” of domestic energy and economic growth – coupled with greenhouse gas reductions (see here, here and here). Let that sink in: The United States is simultaneously the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas and the world leader in reducing emissions. Energy growth and climate progress together. That’s the U.S. Model. It’s important to grasp the impacts of the U.S. model – and also how it came about.

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natural-gas-production  epa-regulation  methane  emssions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 12, 2016

We’ll say it again: Methane emissions are falling. And they’ll continue doing so because industry wants to capture as much of the primary component of natural gas as possible, for delivery to consumers.

So that’s the context for EPA’s regulatory initiative. Basically, the agency looked at the energy landscape – one of surging production but also declining emissions – and determined the next step should be more regulation. The resulting new rules could hinder America’s shale energy revolution, one that has helped lower U.S. energy-related carbon emissions 12 percent below 2005 levels, allowing the United States to lead the world in reducing carbon emissions.

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greenhouse-gas-emissions  methane  carbon-dioxide-emissions  hydraulic-fracturing  oil-and-natural-gas-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 19, 2016

Some important context before a discussion of a flawed emissions report from EPA, which follows below.

The United States is the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas – largely thanks to safe and responsible hydraulic fracturing and advanced horizontal drilling. Natural gas production reached a record high level of 79 billion cubic feet per day in 2015, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (chart), while total U.S. energy output increased for the sixth consecutive year.

The increased natural gas production and use is critically important, as it is the key factor in reduced carbon emissions during a period of U.S. economic expansion – a break with historic precedent noted by the New York Times. Indeed, the United States is leading the world in carbon emissions reductions, largely thanks to its energy revolution.

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methane  emission-reductions  natural-gas  hydraulic-fracturing  electricity 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 5, 2016

Last week EPA launched a new program it hopes will encourage U.S. oil and natural gas companies to voluntarily focus on reducing methane emissions from oil and gas operations. EPA:

The Methane Challenge Program will provide partner companies with a platform to make company-wide commitments to cut emissions from sources within their operations by implementing a suite of best management practices within five years. Transparency is a fundamental part of the program, and partner achievements will be tracked by submitting annual data directly to EPA.

Two points: First, our industry is already on it, deploying technologies, innovation and yes, best management practices, effectively capturing methane from energy operations. And it’s succeeding. EPA data shows that since 2005 methane emissions from field production of natural gas have dropped 38 percent, and emissions from hydraulically fractured natural gas wells have dropped 79 percent – at a time of surging natural gas production.

It’s happening because energy companies are working hard to collect methane, the main component of natural gas, for the market. Indeed, the abundance of domestic natural gas is helping lower consumer energy costs for U.S. consumers – including those in the Northeast, which historically has paid more for electricity than other parts of the country – and increasing average annual household disposable income by $1,200.

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